China Eye Magazine

Contents of SACU's magazine China Eye for the year 2016.

For more details about the magazine please visit the China Eye page.


Issue 52 (Winter 2016)

China Eye 52

Chinese Lacquer Painting and Broken Eggshell - Alina Huang describes the process of creating amazing lacquerwork designs with many illustrations.

An exploration of political meritocracy in China - Dirk Nemmeggeers looks at the pros and cons of the political system in China.

China's current financial standing - Barnaby Powell looks at China's banking system.

Co-operatives in China Tim Zachernuk surveys the development of co-operatives in China and differentiates the different types as well as the governing principles.

Chinese Imperial Court Costume: Ultimate power dressing - David Rosier looks at how the complex grades of Imperial officials could be distinguished by the robes and insignia they wore.

Visiting Gansu - Jenny Clegg reports on a recent trip to Gansu province with special emphasis on commemorations to Rewi Alley and George Hogg.

Reading about China 20 - Dr. Haris Livas-Dawes introduces more books she has found useful in learning about China.

Taste if Beijing - Walter Fung describes the recent London event co-organised with SACU.

SACU's 50th anniversary tour to China - Walter Fung recounts the many places seen and places visited on the tour to China in late October 2016.

Sinofile - A regular round-up of news from China.

China Eye Diary - Notices and events.


Issue 51 (Autumn 2016)

China Eye 51

The George Hogg Fund - Zoe Reed describes visits to George Hogg's school at Harpendon,UK and Shandan Bailie School, Gansu as part of SACU's launch of the George Hogg Fund.

Scotland-China Association's 50th - A report on the meeting to celebrate fifty years of our sister society in Scotland that was founded one year after SACU.

On the Trail of Midnight in Peking - Tamara Treichel goes on a detective trail to uncover the background to the infamous murder of Pamela Werner in 1937.

What's in a Wok? Rodney Mantle and Shirley Liu muse on how Chinese culinary terms have been transformed and translated into English over the centuries.

Carol Hughes remembered- Michael Sherringham, Sally Greenhill and Mocia Janowski recall the life of the loyal SACU member and China enthusiast Carol Hughes.

Beijing's baoshan: Final resting place of China's "Foreign Friends" - Tamara Treichel's tour to Beijing Revolutionary Cemetery found that several foreigners have been honoured with a resting place there.

Reading about China 19 - Dr. Haris Livas-Dawes introduces more books she has found useful in learning about China.

Living and teaching in Beijing in the 1970s - Michael Sherringham recounts his experiences of turbulent times in Beijing

Simplifying the Chinese language - Rob Stallard explains how the wide ranging reform of the written language still poses problems for students today.

They Never Came Home - Andrew Hicks commemorates the lives of members of the Friends Ambulance Service who gave their lives while bringing medical supplies into China in WW2.

Sinofile - A regular round-up of news from China.

China Eye Diary - Notices and events.


Issue 50 (Summer 2016)

China Eye 50

Memories of SACU Rosamund Wong reminiscences on her 40 years of membership of SACU and took part in an early SACU trip of China in 1977.

An Indissoluble Friendship - Brian Morgan recounts the meeting and long friendship with Chinese artist Professor Zhang Yi Fan.

On the Trail of Midnight in Peking - Tamara Treichel goes on a detective trail to uncover the background to the infamous murder of Pamela Werner in 1937.

Asa Briggs - SACU President 1985-2016 Walter Fung and Bob Benewick look back on the life of SACU's second President.

Why I visited China - Bill Gibson describes his recent experience of teaching Mathematics in Baoding, Hebei and explores why Chinese students do so well in mathematics.

Why is understanding so important? - Walter Fung, marking the 50th issue of the magazine that he has edited looks at the fundamentals of understanding China, and shows why SACU's mission is still so important today.

Reading about China 18 - Dr. Haris Livas-Dawes introduces more books she has found useful in learning about China.

My memories of the early days of SACU - Michael Sherringham has been a member of SACU for nearly 50 years, studied under Joseph Needham and visited China in 1971.

Sinofile - A regular round-up of news from China.

China Eye Diary - Notices and events.


Issue 49 (Spring 2016)

China Eye 49

Kowloon's walled city - A unique geographical oddball - Dr. Keith Ray looks at the history of the development of Kowloon, how it became part of Hong Kong and it present state in China.

China's Green Revolution - from our own correspondent - Nacressa Swan looks at the implementation of environmental policies in China.

China and Bertrand Russell - Tony Simpson recounts how the British philosopher met leading Chinese intellectuals in the early 20th century.

Reinventing the Tea Horse Road - Michael Sherringham recalls his experiences of the 2015 trip to China to retrace the journey of tea from Yunnan.

Tankette - The Chinese Labour Corps in World War 1 - John Ham casts some light on the work of Chinese volunteers in support of the Allies in the first World War.

A week in Guangzhou - Walter Fung reports on his brief stay in Guangzhou in October 2015.

The China Campaign Committee: in Britain - 1937-45 - Jenny Clegg outlines the work of the CCC in the difficult period leading up to the second world war.

The fourth of May Movement - Nick Chrimes traces the history of the influential May Fourth movement founded in 1919 in reaction to colonial aggression.

George Hogg Fund - Details of SACU's new initiative to commemorate George Hogg.

Reading about China 17 - Dr. Haris Livas-Dawes introduces more books she has found useful in learning about China.

Sinofile - A regular round-up of news from China.

China Eye Diary - Notices and events.



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